Feng Shui Art Site – Virtual Gallery May 13

LJL DECOR – luxury. joy. love. relaunced with the Woo Themes e-commerce WordPress platform on May 13, 2013. This enables the site to be a virtual gallery, featuring art works from Artistrun Collective artists. Originally, the site was a simple portfolio showcase of Liza J. Lee’s feng shui art squares (below).

Precious Feng Shui Art Squares of Luxury, Joy and Love 

Buy one for luxury and colour to balance the Feng Shui in your peaceful and domestic environment. Every little square fits neatly, side-by-side together, creating an individualized yet unified greater whole. The squares can be personalized by you, the buyer, and individualized like puzzle pieces, accordingly for your apartment or condo layout. Or, simply change with the seasons, by keeping on top of Liza J. Lee‘s colour arrangements…as she continues to paint more Feng Shui art squares that can suit both small and large interiors. (See her Craftivism Art at Diane Farris Gallery.)

Liza’s Feng Shui squares began with the “Mosaic Butterfly” series I and II (see images below). Her most recent mosaic tile paintings (each 8” x 8”), with snowy winter theme were made exclusively as her reflection on the Vancouver, B.C. 2010 Cultural Olympiad. Materials include: acrylic paints, paint sticks and wax. Total finished size: 24” square in total (9 panels), all divisible by 8, an auspicious number in Feng Shui.

Nature is her theme. Liza Lee produces each small square from a place of inner peace, representing inner light and connection to spirit. Liza is making larger squares about the seasons. In one, she has chosen the acrylics “interference blue” or “periwinkle purple” with thalo green to symbolize the freshness of summer.

Liza states, “Vancouver is like a mosaic, with a variety of cultures connected—some more randomly, while others are pieced together with intent.” In keeping with her interest in multiculturalism — Liza has studied images of Tibetan sand painting and traditional Kolam art from India, in particular the artwork of USA printmaker, Radha Chandrashekaran, from Kerala. This daily ritual art is done in temporary white rice paste, painted onto the ‘threshold’ doorways and floors of houses, in the entrances and foyers of traditional homes in South India. (See Liza’s ephemeral “Chalk Art”  interview in the Globe & Mail below.)

Liza’s paintings represents her desire that people all have the power to change themselves for the better, and in the process to grow and to heal…Her butterfly images are representations of the soul’s metamorphosis from a cocoon of private darkness to the light of public transformation; this includes her vision for both the personal and community levels.

She has been a producer and marketer of exciting and wonderful cultural events throughout Vancouver since 1995. Most recently in 2010 she hosted the promotion of 60 original artworks by a diverse group artists from Main Street and around Vancouver. The news of this online “Craftivism Art Show” grew like wildfire through the Artistrun social media network. Lee was also one of the exhibiting artists who featured a set of “Craftivist Art Tiles” made from recycled blog posts from Artistrun. Liza is a bit like Vancouver’s “Faith Popcorn”, as her brain functions similarly, always on the cusp of what’s happening in the culture – especially about e-social marketing trends! (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faith_Popcorn.)

ABOUT DR. LYCIA TROUTON

Co-founder of Artistrun Collective (Artistrun), Lycia is a Land Artist and Lecturer / Writer of Modern and Contemporary Art and Decorative Design History and Theory. She holds a DCA from Australia, an MFA from Cranbrook Art Academy in Michigan and BFA (Hons) USA. Trouton is an Irish/ Ulster Scots- Canadian – Australia – an “International Talent”! Trouton is most well-known for her monumental public artwork, entitled The Linen [handkerchief] Memorial, which helps generate ‘healing-through-remembering’, encourages ‘joint public mourning’ and intercommunal coexistence in post-conflict Northern Ireland. Her large-scale land art, 1990s, has been exhibited in Canada, USA and U.K. — Trouton uses compressed earth materials, constructed using formwork.

After a decade of constructing land art in North America, Dr. Lycia Trouton conceived The Irish Linen (Handkerchief) Memorial in 2001 after exhibiting in North Belfast in 1999. The Linen Memorial was funded by Canada Council of the Arts and is an alternative history document of ‘The Troubles‘ in Northern Ireland. it is a non-hierarchical listing of ALL the names of those who died in the recent period of violent sectarianism. It is a hand sewn memorial on handkerchiefs. Lycia has collaborated with the well-known Australians: Dr. Thomas Fitzgerald, Composer and Elizabeth Cameron Dalman, OAM, and her Mirramu Dance Company. The Memorial was publicly unveiled in Ireland in 2007 as part of The first Private Day of Reflection.

Visit www.linenmemorial.org for more information.

For more about Dr. Lycia Trouton’s art writing, visit www.lyciatrouton.com/articles.php.

END NOTE:

http://www.examiner.com/article/craftivism-art-from-oil-barrels-haitian-circular-gift-of-life-metal-sculptures

CHALK ART – BY TARA WOHLBERG  Friday, July 22, 2005 – Globe & Mail

Step on a crack, break your mother’s back? You could call it sidewalk superstition, but Calvin Smith has his digits doubly crossed for a dry B.C. Day – as in weather. He’s the founder and director of the 2nd Annual Granville Island Chalk Art Competition, an enviro-friendly event that fosters a sense of community like hopscotch never could.

Its subtleties challenge artists, and yet chalk art remains accessible for families playing Leonardo Da Vinci for a day.

Leonardo used a “trellis”, or gird, to ensure correct proportions. Chalk-art competitor John O’Mara swears by grids for his two-by-two metre images. A pop cartoonist, he says his entry is based on a famous photograph he’s keeping secret. Pros map out a grid image with a construction chalk snap line, and then layer ordinary kid’s chalk as a base on uneven cobblestones and interlocking bricks. They hoard special pigments until the end, so their shading techniques aren’t eaten up by the sidewalk.

Hand-washing between using light colours is advised, although a nearby bowl of soapy water could invite disaster: Think wash-out.

In Vancouver, there can be a whole lot of dripping going on, too. Cardboard covers offer protection during construction.

Chalk-art etiquette dictates that walking on images is almost as rude as taking pictures without permission – or a gratuity. (O’Mara insists he is a busker, not a panhandler.)

Local chalk artist Liza J. Lee likens the genre to Tibetan sand paintings for its simplicity, sophistication and temporary nature. Weather permitting, the images can last for weeks but, Lee sighs, “You can spend hours on a piece and then the wind can feather it away.”

(Click on images below to see larger images of paintings based on ephemeral art in nature by Liza Lee.)

Mosaic2 Mosaic1

“Mosaic Art Tiles” (Left) 

Mosaic Art Tiles I and II” began in 2005 and were completed in 2009. Each one of the panels (to make up a monumental final image of nine) is an 8” x 8” square canvases and when pieced together, they become a larger square of 24” x 24”. Many of these panels have snow themes to reflect the 2010 Winter Olympics and Paralympics. Vancouver is like a mosaic, with a variety of cultures connected—some more randomly, while others are pieced together with intent. Every square fits neatly and unifies into the greater whole.

“Beyond Petroleum” (Below) 

craftivism1_72

These “luxury” art tiles are based on Liza J. Lee’s art piece, ”Beyond Petroleum” for the “Craftivism Art Show” for the first Culture Days events in Canada, 2010. It was selected among over 4500 art shows across the country to be in a full-page ad in the Globe & Mail. Each “luxury art tile” is hand-painted in acrylics, resin sand textures and R&F oil sticks for a rich design on a wrapped gallery stretched canvas. Finally, each piece is framed in smooth maple with a mahogany finish to complement the deep earth tones of the painting and to suit many decors. Each piece is 8″ x 8″ with sides painted and ready to hang. The series of four is in a private collection with a Vancouver commercial realtor.

 

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